Wednesday, December 16, 2009

2010 Volkswagen Passat CC R-Line

R-Line equipment is already offered on seven Volkswagen models. Now the Volkswagen Passat CC R-Line has got a sportier touch. Orders are now being taken for the four-door coupé with R-Line package.

On its exterior, 17-inch (optional 18-inch) R-Line "Mallory" alloy wheels with 235/45 tyres lend a sporty touch to the Volkswagen Passat CC R-Line. The front spoiler and side skirts, each painted in body colour, were also re-styled. In addition, R-Line logos embellish the front side sections; the rear lights are smoked.

Inside the Volkswagen Passat CC R-Line, standard features include details like four customised tread plates in aluminium (with R-Line Logo in front) and a three-spoke leather-trimmed steering wheel with multifunction keys. The R-Line package has front fog lights and the Park Pilot system. The Passat R-Line leaves few wishes unfulfilled; even the base version of the Volkswagen Passat CC includes comfort and convenience features like sport seats and a climate control system.

The R-Line package is available with all Volkswagen Passat CC engines. Prices start at 2,200 Euros for the Passat CC 2.0 TDI (140 PS / 103 kW) with a 6-speed gearbox. Counting versions already introduced on the Golf, Scirocco, Touran, Tiguan, Passat, Passat Variant and Touareg, a total of eight models with R-Line equipment are now on the market.

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

2009 Volkswagen Up Lite Concept

Europe's strongest automotive brand - is setting standards worldwide when it comes to efficiency with its clean high-tech TDI and TSI engines. Now this is being followed up by latest coupe at the 2009 Los Angeles Auto Show (December 4 to 13): the world premiere of the Volkswagen Up! Lite Concept. A progressive, fuel efficient and in all details cleverly designed four-seater with a hybrid drive. Combined fuel consumption: 2.44 l/100 km or 70 mpg/highway! No other car is more sustainable. With a drive concept consisting of a TDI (turbo-diesel), electric motor and 7-speed Direct Shift Gearbox (DSG) as well as top aerodynamics (Cd value: 0.237), Volkswagen is driving CO2 emissions down to a sensational 65 g/km. This makes the three-door concept the world's most fuel efficient car - and from the perspective of its overall CO2 footprint the world's most environmentally friendly four-seat car as well. Both technically and visually, the Volkswagen Up! Lite is a preview of the future. The image of the car body with its clean lines, as though sculpted from a block of aluminium, underscores just how fascinating a car tuned to aerodynamic perfection can look.

The ideal car for the daily commute to work

The technically challenging 2-Liter fuel consumption car might be launched globally. Many of the components of the 695 kilogram light Volkswagen are based on those of the future New Small Family, an entirely new model series that is already scheduled for market launch in initial countries at the end of 2011. The Volkswagen Up! Lite concept continues the Volkswagen strategy of offering high-tech and high-end quality in all of its vehicle classes, making progress affordable for every car driver. The Volkswagen Up! Lite was designed to be a versatile vehicle that makes trips into the city, commutes to work and naturally long trips as well significantly less expensive and more eco-friendly.

Hybrid drive enables electric driving

The centerpiece of the Volkswagen Up! Lite powertrain is the newly designed 0.8 TDI two-cylinder turbo-diesel engine with a power of 38 kW / 51 PS. Furthermore, the electric motor (10 kW) - designed as a pulse start module (starter, alternator and E-drive) - also reduces the load of the TDI, provides added propulsion (boosting) and works to recover kinetic energy (regenerative braking). During boost phases - e.g. in a quick passing maneuver - the TDI and E-motor combine for a total power of 48 kW / 65 PS. Incidentally, a version of the TDI used in the Volkswagen Up! Lite was also used aboard the VW L1 concept car that Volkswagen presented in September at the 2009 IAA Motor Show in Frankfurt.

In two of its operating phases, the hybrid drive of the VW Up! Lite was designed to operate without any TDI propulsion at all. First phase: In so-called coast-down, activated by the driver taking his or her foot off the gas pedal (car coasts, TDI engine is shut off). Second phase: Over shorter distances, e.g. in residential areas, the E-motor can power the Volkswagen Up! Lite all by itself. In this case, a lithium-ion battery supplies the energy. Since it is capable of pure electric driving, the configuration is classified as a full hybrid. Shifting work is handled by a 7-speed Direct Shift Gearbox (DSG) like the one used in the new Polo. Moreover, the Volkswagen is equipped with a Stop-Start system.

Comfort and safety without compromises

Naturally, on the Volkswagen Up! Lite there is nothing lacking in comfort or safety. ESP is on board, airbags are on board, ample space is on board, highly advanced information and control features are on board, and it is good to know that occupants are enclosed and protected by a highly innovative safety frame of aluminium, steel and carbon fiber. The Volkswagen concept has a top speed of 160 km/h (100 mph) and accelerates to 100 km/h in a respectable 12.5 seconds (0-60 mph in 12 seconds).

"Made in Germany"

Overall, the Volkswagen Up! Lite is a prime example of the art of innovative engineering with the "Made in Germany" seal. And indeed not only because of its efficient powertrain and lightweight body construction. Other examples include: The radiator grille that closes and opens automatically depending on the cooling needs of the engine ("active thermal management"); and instead of a classic rearview mirror, three cameras perform this job better and more aerodynamically; when the car is parked in the summer, hot air is vented to outside the vehicle ("passive park ventilation"); an "optimized Easy-Entry feature" enables extremely comfortable entry and exit from the rear seating area; longitudinal adjustments to the driver and front passenger seats automatically adjusts seat height as well; when folding the rear bench seat, the seatback is easily unlatched by folding the rear head restraints forward ("Easy Switch"); many vehicle features (including ventilation, Internet, telephone, MP3, video, telephone, trip computer, radio) are controlled centrally via an intuitive touchscreen with hand movement sensors.

Design of the world of tomorrow

Even the most innovative car must look good to really be fun. And the Volkswagen Up! Lite with its "Liquid Blue Metallic" exterior is fun. That is because the 3.84 meter long, 1.40 meter tall and 1.60 meter wide Volkswagen Up! Lite makes a futuristic, bold and - in its form - very independent appearance. It is a car that looks as though it were cast from a single mould. Compared to the Volkswagen E-Up! concept car presented at the 2009 International Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt, it is lower in profile and - to satisfy even more demanding aerodynamic requirements - it is longer, nearly reaching the length of the VW Polo (3.98 meters).

The styling itself portrays a compact vehicle that genuinely reflects its sustainable drive system and overall progressive concept. At the rear, the VW Up! Lite has the appearance of a distinctive hatchback sports car. As a result, the broad shoulder section is definitely reminiscent of the Scirocco. Furthermore, the look of the lower area is dominated by the large glass surface of the hatch, the LED rear lights and the rear fog lights (c-shaped) integrated in the bumper in typical Volkswagen Up! style. The counterparts of these lights are found in the front bumper as front fog lights. The car's side profile has clean styling with markedly smooth surfaces. There are no edges except for the upper tornado line, the wheel wells and a connection line integrated there. The side cameras that replace the outside mirrors look like winglets on the wings of a cargo plane. A novel stylistic and technical feature: the 18-inch wheels are produced from a combination of aluminium and carbon fiber. That is because sports appeal and fuel economy do not need to be mutually exclusive.

Already thinking about tomorrow today

By the way: In Europe, Volkswagen is currently demonstrating that minimal fuel consumption can be realized in all segments today, in the latest versions of the Polo (3.3 l/100 km; 58 mpg/highway), Golf (3.8 l/100 km; 51 mpg/highway) and Passat (4.4 l/100 km; 48 mpg/highway).

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

2011 Volkswagen Amarok

The Volkswagen Amarok, which will be available as a four-door double cab version from launch with a single cab model to follow in 2011, combines the robustness of a pick-up with innovative technology, high safety standards, excellent fuel economy and Volkswagen standards of comfort, quality and durability.

Production of the Volkswagen Amarok is about to start at the Volkswagen factory in Buenos Aires, Argentina ahead of its worldwide launch starting in its native South America in early 2010 and in Europe in the summer of 2010, with first models expected to be in UK Volkswagen Van Centres in September 2010.

The Volkswagen Amarok has a generous payload capacity of up to 1.15 tonnes and maximum towing limit of 2.8 tonnes. Its 2.52 m² cargo area has the largest dimensions in its class at 1,555 mm long and 1,620 mm wide, plus a best in class width between the wheelarches of 1,222 mm, which means that for the first time on a mid-size pick-up, it is possible to load Euro pallets sideways, saving on space.

The official photos show the Volkswagen Amarok reflects the latest Volkswagen design DNA with frontal styling in line with the latest Transporter and Golf. It is 5.25 m long with a ladder frame chassis and will be offered with a choice of rear-wheel drive and switchable or permanent 4MOTION all-wheel drive.

For maximum convenience, the switchable all-wheel drive is engaged by the push of a button, and also has low off-road gearing.

The full-time all-wheel drive version is a rarity in the pick-up sector, and uses a Torsen differential to distribute drive at a 40:60 ratio to the front and rear axles for excellent vehicle dynamics and high traction, and also ensures that the wheel with the best traction always gets the most power. A rear differential lock is available.

Designed to tackle the toughest off-road terrain, the VW Amarok is offered with an electronic differential lock (EDL) and Off-Road ABS to significantly shorten braking distances in off-road conditions or gravel roads. At speeds of under 20 mph it also activates Hill Descent Assist to control hill descents by using selective braking interventions. Furthermore, the ESP Plus system includes Hill Hold Assist, which prevents the vehicle from rolling back by holding it in place on inclines until the driver presses the accelerator pedal.

Under the bonnet there will be a choice of two 2.0-litre fuel-efficient, Euro5 compliant, common rail TDI engines producing 163 PS, with torque of 400 Nm at a low 1,500 rpm, or 122 PS with maximum torque of 340 Nm from 2,000 rpm.

Both engines have a six-speed manual transmission and will have impressive fuel economy with low emissions to make the Volkswagen Amarok the first all-wheel drive pick-up in this class offering CO2 emissions of less than 200 g/km. Like the new Transporter and Caravelle, the Volkswagen Amarok has a gearchange indicator to help drivers achieve the best fuel economy, which with an 80-litre fuel tank should offer a range of over 600 miles.

UK prices and specifications will be confirmed nearer the Volkswagen Amarok's UK launch. The range is expected to comprise a standard model for customers who need a pick-up that is as robust and practical as possible, to offering all the latest luxury items expected for those using Volkswagen Amarok as a leisure vehicle. An extensive accessories programme will also be offered for the Volkswagen Amarok - from a styling bar and running boards, through a cargo cover and Multi-Connect load securing system to a selection of stylish alloy wheels.

The large and ergonomically designed interior is the largest in its class and in many ways resembles that of a Volkswagen passenger car. Easy entry, lots of headroom and ample legroom for passengers on the rear bench seat make the Volkswagen Amarok a fully-fledged five-seater. If only two people are travelling, interior storage space can be increased by folding the rear seat.

Key markets for the Volkswagen Amarok include South America, South Africa and Australia; in these countries, because of their versatility, pick-ups are some of the most sought after recreational and commercial vehicles. Thanks to its efficient drive technology and tremendous versatility, the Volkswagen Amarok is also expected to be a trendsetter in the contemporary pick-up class in Europe.

Monday, October 26, 2009

2010 Volkswagen Polo BlueMotion

Volkswagen Polo BlueMotion, the second generation of this trendsetter, with a combined fuel consumption of just 3.3 litres diesel (equivalent to 87 g/km CO2!) per 100 kilometres, is aiming to become the "3-litre fuel economy car" of the modern era and the most economical five-seater in the world. Its 45 litre fuel tank enables a theoretical driving range of 1,363 kilometres! This makes the commute to work, driving holiday or long weekend affordable again. A person driving from Hanover - the site of the press presentation for the new Volkswagen Polo BlueMotion - to Venice can cover the 1,148 kilometre journey for just 40 Euros in fuel costs. That is because 100 kilometres cost just 3.50 Euros in the Volkswagen Polo BlueMotion. Another measure of cost effectiveness: according to the German Federal Bureau of Statistics, the average German car driver covers a total of 11,000 kilometres per year. For VW Polo BlueMotion owners this means that they only require eight fill-ups per year at a fuel cost of 385 Euros.

"BlueMotion" is the best known German automotive environmental label. It debuted in 2006 with the first generation of the Volkswagen Polo BlueMotion, and its combined fuel con sumption figure of just 3.9 litres per 100 kilometres was the best in the world for a five-seat car. At the same time, this Volkswagen Polo represented the beginning of a product offensive being conducted today under the "BlueMotion-Technologies" umbrella brand, which is as unique as it is successful.

Saturday, October 3, 2009

2010 Volkswagen Golf GTI US-Version

For nearly three decades, the Volkswagen Golf GTI has represented a potent combination of sports car-like finesse and tuned driving excitement in a versatile hatchback design. The all-new 2010 GTI ushers in the sixth generation of Volkswagen's "hot hatch" lineage, and continues the evolution of an award-winning formula that has impressed driving enthusiasts across the globe.

With its fully redesigned exterior, including a more aggressive front end, cleaner side profile, and sleeker hatch area, the Volkswagen Golf GTI upholds its sporty nature. New interior enhancements help set the GTI apart not only from the competition, but also previous generations, and allow both the driver and passengers to enjoy total control and comfort. Starting at $23,290, the 2010 Volkswagen Golf GTI stays true to its heritage by providing a dynamic driving experience at an affordable price, and is ready to reward its owners with every start of the ignition.


As an icon heading into the next decade, the 2010 Golf GTI two and four-door models take a number of styling cues from the original Mk I, as well as the more recent past, and revitalizes them. In true Volkswagen Golf GTI style, the more aggressive front end starts with the hallmark black honeycomb grille with the GTI badge on the passenger side, and the distinct red stripe outline, which flows into the new angled teardrop headlight housings (High Intensity Gas-discharged Xenon headlamps with AFS are optional). Sitting between two halogen fog lamps, the lower front fascia's cooling duct is blacked out.

A more streamlined profile continues heading toward the rear, with a more subtle pair of black side skirts that only run partially along the Volkswagen Golf GTI's lower edge, and the absence of any side moldings. In the rear, newly-shaped taillights integrated into the quarter panels and hatch include smoked red brake lenses that are underlined by clear reverse and turn signal lenses. Blended into the updated rear bumper are red running lamp lenses, along with a blacked out diffuser with special cutouts for the chrome-tipped, split dual-exhaust. Low-profile all-season performance tires are standard. Summer performance tires are an available option. Atop the rear hatch is a body color duckbill spoiler, which houses the third brake light.

The Volkswagen Golf GTI comes standard with 17 x 7-inch alloy wheels wrapped in allseason performance tires, and can be upgraded to larger 18 x 7.5-inch versions with either all-season or summer performance tires to match. A full-power tinted glass sunroof is also available as an option.

Engine and Transmission

Under the hood, the latest version of the VW Golf GTI utilizes the acclaimed 2.0-liter 16-valve DOHC turbocharged and intercooled four-cylinder gasoline engine, with FSI direct fuel injection and maintenance-free hydraulic lifters. Bred for smooth, top-notch performance, the engine features an advanced, fully-electronic management system that combines drive-by-wire throttle control and FSI direct fuel injection to cut back on emissions while increasing overall fuel efficiency and power.

Producing 200 horsepower at 5,100 rpm, and 207 lbs.-ft. of torque from 1,800 all the way up to 5,000 rpm, the Volkswagen Golf GTI's 2.0-liter engine is prepared to take to the road with force. With the standard six-speed manual transmission, the Volkswagen Golf GTI can go from a zero to 60 mph in 6.8 seconds, and on to an electronically limited 130 mph top speed. Power delivery remains smooth and direct across the rpm range, allowing for a swift, 7.5 second run from 37 to 62 mph in fifth gear, and finishes with a redline of 6,500 rpm. In terms of fuel economy, the 2.0T engine and six-speed manual transmission deliver an EPA-estimated 31 mpg on the highway, and 21 mpg in city driving.

For drivers who want the performance of a traditional manual transmission with the precision and ease of use of an automatic gearbox, the Volkswagen Golf GTI is available with an optional automatic Direct Shift Gearbox (DSG®) transmission. This technologically advanced six-speed transmission incorporates an automatic dualclutch system that instantly engages and disengages gears without the need for a clutch pedal. With a special computer controlling the process, one clutch is engaged on the next gear needed while the clutch from the previous gear is released. The results are crisp, quick shifts without the loss of power that is experienced with a traditional manual gearbox, and the ability for the Volkswagen Golf GTI to reach 60 mph in 6.7 seconds from a standstill. The 2010 GTI's fuel economy is improved when equipped with the DSG transmission, which attains an EPAestimated 32 mpg in highway driving, and 24 mpg in city driving.

Those owners who opt for the DSG transmission can switch between full automatic operation, which requires no additional action beyond moving the gear shift lever to the "D" position, and automated manual operation, which enables the driver to control every gear change. Volkswagen Tiptronic® lets the driver shift up and down as he prefers, using either the finger-operated paddles mounted to the Volkswagen Golf GTI's steering wheel, or by tapping the gearshift selector up or down. As an added performance bonus with the DSG transmission, a Launch Control program can be enabled, which, when the car is stopped, allows the engine to build revs before the first clutch is engaged, and creates a more perfect launch with controlled wheel-spin.

Chassis and Suspension

To ensure all of the VW Golf GTI's power makes its way to the road, a fully independent, European-tuned suspension is employed at all four corners to provide drivers with the confidence they demand on even the most challenging roads and conditions. At the front, McPherson struts with lower control arms are complemented by a tubular anti-roll bar to keep the front tires planted, especially in the corners, and connect to an all-aluminum sub-frame to reduce unsprung mass. The track-stabilization steering roll radius cuts back on body roll in tight turning situations, and has a more direct steering ratio for improved driver feedback.

Keeping the car settled at the rear without sacrificing passenger comfort, a four-link independent setup with the springs and shock absorbers positioned apart from each other are matched with a separate sub-frame and another tubular anti-roll bar. The sport-tuned arrangement comes with an added benefit - increased cargo space - by allowing for a larger rear hatch opening.

Helping the Volkswagen Golf GTI to head into the corners with ease is an electro-mechanical power rack-and-pinion steering system. With good on-center feel, confidenceinspiring responsiveness to driver input at all positions, active-return steering, and straight-ahead driving correction assistance, the system seamlessly unites the GTI and its driver.

Bringing the Volkswagen Golf GTI to a halt are vented 312mm x 25mm disc brakes at the front, and solid 286mm x 12mm disc brakes at the rear, all with red-painted calipers that can be seen through the new 17 x 7-inch alloy wheels.

Active and Passive Safety

The 2010 GTI comes with standard with a collection of safety features and enhancements, including a three channel Anti-lock Brake System (ABS), Anti-slip Regulation (ASR), Electronic Differential Lock (EDL), Engine Braking Assist (EBA), Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS), and Electronic Stabilization Program (ESP®). Like all 2009 model year Volkswagens ESP comes standard on all 2010 model year vehicles, ahead of the U.S. government's mandate that by 2012, all vehicles produced will need to have some form of Electronic Stability Control (ESC).

New for the sixth generation Volkswagen Golf GTI is a standard Electronic Limited Slip system that Volkswagen has named XDS. The system electronically monitors input from various wheel sensors and, in the event of slippage, transfers extra torque to the wheel or wheels with the most traction.

Like all Volkswagens, the GTI also includes the Prevent and Preserve Safety System, consisting of 40 standard safety features. As standard equipment, the Volkswagen Golf GTI includes, but is not limited to: Six airbags (dual front, dual front side thorax, and side curtains), optimized head restraints, front seatbelt pretensioners with load limiters, and three-point safety belts in all five seating positions (two front and three rear). In the four-door VW Golf GTI, rear side airbags are available as an option, as are rear outboard safety belts with pretensioners and load limiters.


The 2010 GTI continues its performance showcase inside the cabin, with accommodations that will delight both driver and passengers. Heavily bolstered front seats are wrapped in patterned sport fabric with red and white doublestitching throughout, come standard with eight-way manual adjustment, adjustable lumbar support and head restraints, and are heated. On two-door models, both front seats incorporate the Easy Entry System for improved access to the rear seating area. The three-spoke flat bottom steering wheel has been upgraded with an embossed center section, aluminum trim on the spokes, red stitching, and perforated leather along the top and bottom sections for better grip.

The instrument panel has also been redesigned, with chrome trim surrounding the large tachometer on the left, which incorporates a smaller, integrated engine temperature gauge as well as the matching speedometer on the right, which features an integrated fuel gauge. Standing between the black analog gauges is a multi-function onboard computer display that provides the driver with key information regarding the fuel mileage, odometer, and more. Metallic highlights continue throughout the interior, gracing the gearshift knob, the trim inserts and the pedal cluster, and brushed-metal accents add a sense of sophistication to the HVAC controls and stereo unit.

The Volkswagen Golf GTI comes standard with an 8-speaker sound system with an AM/FM/Sirius™ satellite radio, touch-screen in-dash six-disc CD changer with MP3 format readability, theft deterrence, auxiliary input jack along with an iPod® adapter, and Bluetooth™ connectivity for hands-free calling with a paired mobile phone.. For increased audio fidelity and enjoyment, the 300W Dynaudio Lite premium sound system can be ordered.

The Volkswagen Golf GTI's Autobahn options package for both the two and four-door models adds top sport front seats, leather seating surfaces front and rear, and a power sunroof. Owners can also order their 2010 VW Golf GTI with a touch-screen navigation system that includes a 6.5" high resolution display, integrated 30GB hard drive (10GB for navigation, 20GB for audio), WMA / MP3 audio CD playback, DVD playback, an SD memory card slot, a 3.5mm auxiliary input jack in the center console. The system provides both visual and audible commands through the center console display, as well as the digital display located in the instrument cluster.


The 2010 GTI comes standard with 24-hour Roadside Assistance for three years or 36,000 miles (whichever occurs first), plus the following new vehicle warranties:
Five-year / 60,000 mile (whichever occurs first) Powertrain Limited Warranty
Three-year / 36,000 mile (whichever occurs first) New Vehicle Warranty
12-year unlimited distance Limited Warranty against corrosion perforation

The GTI, like all 2010 model year Volkswagens, is included in the nocharge Carefree Maintenance Program. Under this program, all of the Volkswagen Golf GTI's scheduled maintenance, as described in the maintenance booklet, is covered for the length of the New Vehicle Warranty - three years or 36,000 miles, whichever occurs first. Additionally, all current Volkswagens, including the GTI, use synthetic oil, which, when combined with state-of-the-art German engineering, eliminates the need for a 5,000 mile oil change. This ultimately allows for all current Volkswagen owners to driver farther between scheduled oil changes.

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

2010 Volkswagen Golf R

At the 2009 IAA, however, Volkswagen is demonstrating - with the debut of Volkswagen Golf R - that fuel consumption values can even be corrected downward in the high-end sports car area. And indeed without even a hint of a compromise in dynamic performance. On the contrary. Traditionally each new R version of this model series bears the title "strongest Golf of all times." With a power of 199 kW / 270 PS (at 6,000 rpm), the new Volkswagen Golf R is continuing in this dynamic tradition; the previous model transferred 184 kW / 250 PS to its all-wheel drive system. The highlight here: While the now retired Volkswagen Golf R32 processed 10.7 litres of fuel through its fuel injection system every 100 kilometres, on the new Volkswagen Golf R the figure is just 8.5 litres - 2.2 litres or 21 percent less! CO2 emissions were reduced from 255 to 199 g/km. Like all R models, this one was also conceptualised by Volkswagen Individual.

In parallel, its performance data advanced as well. The new Volkswagen Golf R sprints from 0 to 100 km/h - also via all-wheel drive - in 5.7 seconds. On the previous model, the stopwatch stopped at 6.5 seconds. The new model puts the 1,000-meter mark behind it in 25.4 seconds, while the already masterful Golf R32 shot past this mark in 26.7 seconds. The Volkswagen Golf R does this even better with the optional DSG gearbox, sprinting to 100 km/h in a sensational 5.5 seconds and requiring just 8.4 litres petrol per 100 kilometres (equivalent to 195 g/km CO2) at the fuel pump.

The enormous efficiency gain of the new Golf R is not based on some magical trick, rather it is the result of highly advanced downsizing. Its legendary predecessor generated its power from a displacement of 3.2 litres ("32") and six cylinders. In the new model, this is done with four cylinders and 2.0 litres of displacement - a highly advanced direct injection petrol engine with turbocharging (TSI). At the fuel pump and on the winding mountain road, this high-tech alliance is superior to a classic six cylinder unit with multi-point injection. Proving that even the sound of a four cylinder can leave a strong impression are the fifth and sixth generations of the VW Golf GTI, which is also powered by a four cylinder TSI. And the Volkswagen Golf R exhibits an even greater "sound range."

The TSI's torque characteristic is just as impressive. By comparison: The six cylinder of the previous model developed a maximum torque of 320 Newton-meters at 2,500 rpm. And that was already remarkably good. The turbo four-cylinder direct injection engine of the new Volkswagen Golf R, on the other hand, transfers 350 Newton-meters torque to the crankshaft, which is also available starting at 2,500 rpm, but it can maintain this peak value up to 5,000 rpm. So the new car delivers a fascinatingly high level of basic dynamic performance. The Volkswagen Golf R32 and Golf R are really only equal in one discipline; they both have a top speed of 250 km/h (electronically limited on the Volkswagen Golf R).

TSI of the Volkswagen Golf R

The EA113 series direct-injection petrol engine is used in the new Volkswagen Golf R; its turbocharger makes it very flexible and variable right up into the highest performance ranges. The 1,984 cm3 TSI's specific power is a respectable 100.3 kW / 136.6 PS per litre displacement, and its response is just as impressive. The engine's power can be spontaneously summoned in the blink of an eye throughout its speed range. The engine also impressively underscores its potential acoustically. Visually too: Its two chrome tailpipes can be seen at the centre of the bumper under the diffuser integrated there - an "R trait" that the previous model also displayed.

The in-line four-cylinder engine develops its tremendous propulsive power via a turbocharger (up to 1.2 bar boost pressure) with intercooling. The engine, with a weight of just 152 kilograms, is controlled by a fully electronic engine management system with E-Gas. The cylinders of the four-cylinder engine have been equipped with reinforcing bolts, unlike less powerful TSI versions. Also designed to be stronger are the connecting rods, so that they can reliably transfer the engine's high torque to the crankshaft. Last but not least the cylinder block was also reinforced to handle the aggressive engine forces.

New all-wheel drive on the Volkswagen Golf R

As standard equipment, the Volkswagen Golf R transfers the TSI's power to the road via the latest generation of Volkswagen's 4Motion all-wheel drive system. Compared to the version implemented in the Golf R32, the system underwent significant advanced development. Above all, power transmission between the front and rear axles - especially the all-wheel differential that operates in an oil bath - exhibits clear advances compared to the previous generation. The most important one: Activation of the all-wheel differential no longer requires a difference in speeds between the front and rear axles.

That is because, different than on the previous generation, for the first time an electric pump is used to build pressure. The electric pump supplies oil to a hydraulic reservoir whose working pressure is 30 bar. A control module computes the ideal drive torque for the rear axle and controls, via a valve, how much oil pressure is applied to the working pistons of the multi-plate clutch. The contact pressure at the clutch plates rises in proportion to the desired torque at the rear axle. The amount of torque that is transferred can be varied continuously with the magnitude of the pressure applied to the clutch plates. Compared to the previous 4Motion generation, the system operates independent of slip, since the system's working pressure is always available. When starting up and accelerating, this prevents spinning of the wheels at the front axle more effectively, since the control module regulates the torque distribution based on dynamic axle loads. In extreme cases, nearly 100 percent of the drive torque can be directed to the rear axle. This results in further gains in active safety and dynamic performance.

Sport chassis and brakes on the VW Golf R

When it came to the chassis, development engineers were able to adopt the first-class system in the current production Golf. This means: In front the familiar McPherson strut suspension with helical springs and telescoping shock absorbers; and at the rear a multi-link suspension ensures that the standard ESP seldom needs to intervene. Nonetheless, the basic layout was transformed into a sport chassis with ride-height lowered 25 millimetres, and the springs, dampers and stabilisers were completely retuned to match.

The brake system was also modified for the higher level of driving performance on the Volkswagen Golf R. In place of a 16-inch system, a 17-inch brake system is used with internally ventilated discs all around and R-specific brake calipers painted a high-gloss black with R logo. In front the discs are 345 millimetres in diameter, and 310 millimetres at the rear. The electronic stabilisation program (ESP) was also modified. It can be switched to a new Sport mode via the ESP button. During very fast and curve-filled drives - as on a motorsport race course - the ESP system delays intervention, enabling even more responsive handling properties. The electro-mechanical power-assist steering of the Golf R was also given a sportier characteristic. If the sports car is ordered with the optional DCC dynamic chassis control option, the power-assist steering even assumes a specially tuned characteristic for each of the system's driving modes (Sport, Normal, Comfort).

The chassis maintains contact with the road through its standard newly designed 18-inch alloy wheels ("Talladega" type) with 225/40 tyres. As an option, the same wheels are available in a 19-inch version with 235/35 tyres.

Exterior features of the VW Golf R

Like the first two generations of the Super Golf (I starting in 2002, II in 2005) and the new sister model, the Volkswagen Scirocco R, the new Golf R too sports a completely modified set of exterior and interior features. Volkswagen designers, led by Klaus Bischoff, have given the Volkswagen Golf R an independent image with a bundle of well-coordinated refinements. The Volkswagen Golf R unmistakably marks the peak of the model series, and the quality of its styling follows the basic postulate of "La Semplicità" set forth by the Head of Group Design, Walter de Silva.

Outside, the customisation includes new wheels and brakes as well as new bumper designs. In front, three very large air intakes characterise the VW Golf R in the bumper area; the louvres on the intakes are painted in high-gloss black, and standard LED strips that serves as daytime running lights are integrated in the two outer air intakes. Also painted in high-gloss black are the two louvres of the radiator grille. Placed on the right side of the grille is the newly designed R logo in chrome. Bi-Xenon headlights, included without surcharge, illuminate the way through the night. On its sides, the Volkswagen Golf R is identified by its Talladega wheels, side skirt extensions in car colour and mirror housings painted in high-gloss black.

It is also possible to recognise the Volkswagen Golf R as an independent top model at the rear. Along with the bumper with diffuser and tailpipes, R logo and larger roof edge spoiler, the newly developed taillights stand out. They operate with standard, distinctive LED technology. The taillight covers are also smoked.

Interior features of the VW Golf R

The sixth generation Volkswagen Golf, with its high-end interior materials, breaks through boundaries to the next higher class. The Golf R also benefits from this quality image; it is in a league of its own based on its power reserves. Additional special upgrades developed by Volkswagen Individual underscore the car's high-class positioning.

A key equipment option here is the newly designed "Top Sport seat system" with its excellent ergonomic properties. The driver just sits down, adjusts the seat longitudinally and in height, adjusts the steering wheel, buckles up, and is ready to go. The seat fits as though tailor-made. Together with the similarly customised Volkswagen Golf GTI and Golf GTD, the Golf R sets standards here among the international competition. The centre panels of the sport seats are upholstered in the honeycomb textured grey-black "Kyalami" design - named after the race course by the same name in South Africa. The front edge of the seat is upholstered in Titan Black fabric, while the inside panels of the side supports are upholstered with crystal-grey "San Remo" micro-fibres. The rest of the seat components and the roofliner are coloured black. The new R logo is embroidered in the front head restraints as well. Motorsport shell seats for driver and front passenger are also available as an option. In this case, the centre seat panels are upholstered in the "San Remo" micro-fibre fabric. On the outside, the shell seats are covered with black leather.

All seams of the interior are in "Art Grey"; this is also true of the decorative seams on the three-spoke leather steering wheel. Perforated leather is used at the top and bottom of the steering wheel, ensuring maximum hand grip. The sides of the steering wheel featuring ergonomic motorsport attributes are covered by continuous leather. Spokes in fine black piano paint add an elegant aspect to complete the sporty image. The centre steering wheel spoke bears the new R logo. The fascinating material contrast of piano paint and chrome conveys an image of the passion for finesse and precision in every detail.

Other new design features include the R gearshift knob, carpet floor mats, aluminium door tread plates with R logo and the instruments with their blue pointers. Stainless steel sport pedals and R-specific instrument and door accents in "Silver Lane" style complete the customisation. Another standard feature on the Volkswagen Golf R is an automatic climate control system ("Climatronic"), "RCD 310" radio-CD system (4 x 20 Watt) including MP3 player plus dual tuners. The Volkswagen Golf R can be ordered in Germany starting at the end of 2009.

2009 Volkswagen L1 Concept

The Volkswagen L1 Concept is unique in the world today. Thanks to a carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) body, it weighs just 380 kilograms. The two-seater is powered by a new common rail turbo-diesel (two-cylinder TDI) and an electric motor. With its average fuel consumption of 1.49 litres diesel per 100 kilometres, this fully road-ready and extremely aerodynamic L1 (Cd 0.195!) is advancing to become the most fuel-efficient hybrid automobile in the world. CO2 emissions of the 160 km/h fast concept car are just 39 g/km. If the Volkswagen L1 were to also go into production in 2013, it would debut an entirely new lightweight car concept and introduce a new era in automotive production.


The TDI, E-motor and 7-speed DSG are located at the rear, and they combine to create the most fuel efficient road-legal car hybrid drive in the world. Proof of this are its 1.38 litre per 100 kilometres fuel consumption and 36 g/km CO2 emissions. Serving as the primary drive source is a completely redeveloped two-cylinder turbo-diesel with common rail direct injection (TDI). It is operated in two different modes depending on the load conditions. In the standard "ECO" mode, the 800 cm3 TDI develops a power of 20 kW / 27 PS (at 4,000 rpm); in "Sport" mode - used to reach top speed, for example - the car's power rises to 29 kW / 39 PS (at 4,000 rpm). The TDI's maximum torque is 100 Newton-meter (at 1,900 rpm). Naturally, the Volkswagen L1 also has a Stop-Start system that automatically shuts down the engine when vehicle has stopped and restarts when the accelerator or E-pedal is pressed.

The hybrid module has been integrated into the housing of the 7-speed DSG (Direct Shift Gearbox). It is located between the TDI engine and the DSG gearbox and consists of a 10 kW / 14 PS electric motor and a clutch. The E-motor is supplied with energy from a lithium-ion battery located at the front of the car. An electronic power control module, operating at around. 130 Volts manages the flow of high voltage energy the battery and to the E-motor. In parallel, the vehicle's low voltage electrical system is supplied with the necessary 12 Volts through a DC/DC converter.

Electric motor - details of the E-motor

In normal operation the electric motor can support the TDI engine in conditions such as by electronic load point shifting and in acceleration. If necessary - generally during acceleration - the E-motor can supply 40 percent additional torque over the entire speed engine speed range. Moreover, the E-motor can propel the Volkswagen L1 over short distances by itself. In this case, an auxiliary clutch decouples the TDI from the drivetrain. Restarting the TDI is a very easy process. In so-called "pulse starting" of the TDI, the electric motor is sped up and is then coupled to the TDI unit to provide almost instant starting. The entire process takes place automatically and without jolts, so the driver hardly notices the restarting of the TDI engine.

In braking phases, the E-motor operates as a generator to charge the lithium-ion battery by recovering braking energy. The gears of the automatically shifting DSG are always selected with the aim of achieving the best possible fuel economy. The engine controller regulates all energy flow and drive management tasks taking into account the moment by moment demands for power made by the driver. Some of the parameters used to calculate the optimum propulsion mode for the given conditions are: accelerator pedal position, engine load, momentary fuel demand, energy supply and the mix of kinetic and electrical energy at any given time.

Diesel engine - details of the 0.8 TDI

The TDI engine in the Volkswagen L1 Concept is a new development. Yet, even here Volkswagen has been able to exploit synergies to design an engine that is both innovative and cost-effective. Hence, this 0.8 litre TDI unit has been derived from the 1.6 TDI just introduced a few months ago. The 1.6 TDI is making its debut at the IAA in cars such as the new version of the Golf BlueMotion (3.8 l/100 km) and the Passat BlueMotion (4.4 l/100 km) - which are currently the world's most fuel-efficient production cars in their respective classes.

Based on their common origins, the 0.8 TDI and 1.6 TDI have identical cylinder spacing (88 millimetres), bore (79.5 millimetres) and stroke (80.5 millimetres). These high-tech TDI engines also share key internal engine features for reducing emissions. They include special piston crowns, multi-injection and individual orientations of the specific injection jets. On both drivetrains there is exhaust gas recirculation, an oxidation catalytic converter and a diesel particulate filter. Equipped this way, the TDIs in each Volkswagen fulfil the limits of the Euro-5 emissions standard with ease.

The 1.6 TDI, thanks to its common rail injection, is also an exceptionally quiet and low-vibration diesel engine. These positive properties have been successfully transferred to the two-cylinder unit. The TDI's aluminium crankcase was also constructed with high precision to achieve very low friction losses. The oil pump, designed to operate at a maximum oil pressure of 4.0 bar, also contributes to engine efficiency.

Another example of how the entire drive system is configured for high efficiency is the Volkswagen L1's cooling system. Its external water pump is controlled by engine management so that cooling is only activated while engine operating conditions require it. This thermal management also contributes to reduced fuel consumption. A second electric water pump, also activated only when needed, provides cooling required for the starter generator and the power electronics in a separate water circulation loop operating at a lower temperature level.

Automatic transmission - details of the 7-speed DSG

Gear shifting work aboard the Volkswagen L1 is handled by the 7-speed DSG, which is one of the most innovative automatic transmissions in production. Compared to the version equipping the new Polo, for example, the design of the Direct Shift Gearbox has been developed to include clutch control for the hybrid module. Furthermore, individual gear ratios have been optimised to attain responsive driving performance despite the car's extremely low fuel consumption. The hybrid module is integrated into the DSG housing as previously mentioned. It is located where the flywheel is usually to be found.

Driving performance - economical and yet responsive

The Volkswagen L1, equipped with ABS and ESP, has a top speed of up to 160 km/h - this is remarkable considering its fuel efficiency. With maximum acceleration from a standstill, the two-seater reaches 100 km/h after just 14.3 seconds. The fuel tank holds just ten litres yet, this is sufficient for a theoretical driving range of about 670 kilometres, given the car's 1.38 litre average fuel consumption.


Talking about car driving as 'piloting' might sound out of place, but in the case of the Volkswagen L1 it is wholly appropriate. The driver (in the CFRP tube frame seat) and passenger (in the fixed CFRP seat that is part of the monocoque) sit one behind the other. At both locations, the seat position is ergonomical and very comfortable. All instruments and controls are arranged over a 180 degree radius for the driver, which places them perfectly within view and reach. The instrument panel itself has been integrated into the monocoque and is made of CFRP. The interior applications are produced from glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP). One of the materials Volkswagen is introducing for interior side trim is the new "Sport Esteem" material that is as robust as it is touch-friendly.

To start the Volkswagen L1, the driver pushes a button on the right side of the steering wheel. When it is rotated, the round start button simultaneously serves as a gear selector switch and is used to activate the electronic handbrake (Drive, Neutral, Reverse and Park). The entry canopy and rear hatch are opened electrically by touch controls to the left and right of the driver. Also designed as touch sensors are controls for the entire air conditioning control system. Via multifunctional keys in the steering wheel, the driver controls the on-board computer, navigation and entertainment systems.

The classic door mirror and rear-view mirror have been completely eliminated on the Volkswagen L1. In their place, cameras display images on OLED-active (OLED = organic light emitting diode) displays located on the left and right sides of the instrument panel. A Park Distance Control (PDC) system makes parking easier as well.

In case of a crash, not only are the driver and passenger protected by the monocoque, which is designed as a highly rigid CFRP safety cell, as well as aluminium crash elements in the front of the car, but also by a steering wheel airbag and head/side curtain airbags to the left and right inside the entry canopy.


Both technically and visually, the CFRP body is already a significant achievement in car design. Unique on this car: the proportions of its dimensions. While the length of the Volkswagen L1 at 3,813 millimetres is still similar to that of a Volkswagen Fox, and its height of 1,143 millimetres nearly matches that of a Lamborghini Murciélago, the car's aerodynamically optimised width (1,200 millimetres) has no comparisons in the world of today's production cars.

CFRP body - Monocoque and exterior skin

The two-seat monocoque, including the tubular frame driver's seat and passenger seat as well as the exterior body skin, all consist of CFRP. There are no doors. Instead, the driver and passenger climb into the Volkswagen L1 from the top. An electrically actuated entry canopy above the seats is opened and closed for this purpose. Headlights and taillights all utilize LED technology, which consume a lot less energy. The rear wheels are completely covered; their wheel covers can be removed to change the Michelin low resistance tires ("Energy Saver": front 95/60 R16, rear 115/70 R16). The underbody is also completely enclosed. The 0.8 TDI is cooled via adaptive air channels integrated in the sides of the car body. These automatically open and close based on the hybrid unit's operating state and vehicle speed. The tailgate is opened in the usual, manual way. It too consists of CFRP. Inside is a stowage space of 50 litres.

CFRP advantages - composition and weight

Carbon fibre reinforced plastic, as the name implies, consists of multiple layers of high-strength carbon fibres, which are integrated in a very tough matrix. This mix results in an extremely strong and lightweight composite material. Until now, producing a body like that of the Volkswagen L1 from CFRP, while conforming to industrial standards, was an insurmountable task. Up to now CFRP was only practical for very small production runs, as in aircraft manufacturing or motorsport. Now Volkswagen has succeeded in finding a production-viable and cost-effective way to produce CFRP parts in suitable volumes.

The reason that CFRP is the ideal material for the Volkswagen L1 body is demonstrated by considering its weight and strength. The Volkswagen L1 weighs just 380 kilograms, which is equivalent to the weight of a very high-end, fully equipped touring motorcycle of the 1200-cc class. The Volkswagen L1, on the other hand, is an automobile through and through. Of the 380 kilograms curb weight, 122 kilograms are taken by the drivetrain, 79 kilograms by the chassis, 35 kilograms by interior furnishings and 20 kilograms by the electrical system. 124 kilograms remain, and this is precisely the weight of the body.

These 124 kilograms can be further broken down: 64 kilograms are accounted for by the CFRP monocoque including integrated passenger seat, 28 kilograms is the weight of the entire CFRP exterior skin, 19 kilograms for the CFRP entry canopy, 9 kilograms for the CFRP driver's seat and 4 kilograms for the LED lights. By way of comparison: The body of the legendary Lupo 3L - until today the smallest Volkswagen production car ever built - weighed 306 kilograms, and the entire car weighed a lightweight 813 kilograms. That is 433 kilograms more than the Volkswagen L1.

And there are other advantages: the material's extremely high stress limits and its ideal forming properties for even the most challenging of design features.

Design - anything but typical, yet a typical Volkswagen

The design and styling of the Volkswagen L1 Concept - function and form - combine to form one uncompromising unit. Walter de Silva, Head of Design for the Volkswagen Group has this to say: "The design of the Volkswagen L1 redefines classic and aesthetic vehicle traits. Especially significant, of course, is how the nearly rocket-shaped lines catch one's attention. All of its moving parts are integrated so accurately that the body resembles a rocket or jet. It is a body that cuts through the air with minimal aerodynamic resistance." A top Cd value of 0.195 and 1.02 m2 frontal area (Cd x A = 0.199 m2) is a statement that is sculpted into the CFRP.

And this is how it looks, the most aerodynamic front end in the world: "The typical layout of conventional headlights with a radiator grille in the middle would be entirely inappropriate here," says de Silva. "That is why we chose a more minimalistic layout and integrated the headlights into a neutral horizontal stripe that conveys a far-sighted and contemporary feeling." The Head of Group Design continues: "In a sense, we applied the same principle to the front end of the Scirocco, where the headlights are joined by a glossy black stripe, and the brand logo is also placed on the engine bonnet. This underscores the dynamic character of this automobile."

The extremely aerodynamic design also shapes the rear with its diffuser and wheels that are completely enclosed. The most distinctive feature of the overall appearance in the rear are the LED taillights that were worked into the TDI's air outlet ports. De Silva: "The same stylistic features as in front are repeated in the rear, in the taillights - which we have integrated in the grilles of the two air outlet ports; they have an even more aerodynamic appearance. Another identifying feature is the air outlet directly behind the cockpit - a nearly abstract, graphic element that underscores the purposeful aesthetics of this vehicle." Due to the driver's low seating position, there is an additional window in the roof that is ideal, for example, to view traffic lights.


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